MAUD Essay 4: Requirements

Students are able to:

  1. Identify the organisations, political and economic constraints, and regulatory frameworks that inform planning and design development.
  2. Understand the role of the architect within a professional team and within wider society
  3. Understand the social, political and economic mechanisms that that enable project realisation
  4. Identify further learning needs for preparation for qualification as an architect

Teaching and learning methods and strategies

Project development in studio introduces each student to contextual constraints (1) while the fieldwork period and the regular assessment of work through its duration guide students through the regulatory, technical and economic implications of their projects and the surrounding sites (1). Weekly studio sessions in the Easter term introduce implementation strategies, the nature of contracts, planning procedure and building regulations as well as providing a forum for an on-going discussion of the role of the architect and the nature of practice (1, 2 & 3). Individual supervision of the Project Implementation Essay supports students’ analysis of the social, political and economic
factors influencing the potential realisation of their projects.

Assessment

Skills 1,2 & 3 are assessed through the Project Implementation Essay, the project report forming part of the thesis portfolio, individual RIBA mapping documents, and the fieldwork logbook. Skill 4 is assessed through a final feedback, transition session that provides individual guidance for the next stages of professional development wit a
panel of practitioners.

 

ESSAY 4: PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION ESSAY (Deadline 17th March, 12:00)

Requirement: 3,000 – 5,000 words

Printed and bound hard copy document (2 copies) and uploaded to Moodle dropbox by
17hr of submission day.

The fourth essay is produced during the fieldwork phase and serves as a means to draw productively on the experience gained during this period. The essay is expected to project a clear implementation strategy for each student’s evolving design proposal. Work is to take account of the political, social and economic factors that would impinge upon the realization of the design and to propose strategies for navigating these issues (GC11.2). Students are to explicitly identify the organisations, regulations and procedures involved in the negotiation and approval of their projects. (GC 11.1) At a broad, strategic level, the essay is to reflect the political context of the work in question. It should demonstrate an advanced understanding of the local, regional and national policies and debates that influence the context and development of the design proposal and the refinement of its brief. At a more detailed scale, students should define the scope, location and brief of their project precisely and use the essay to specify the role of the architect in the realization of the proposal, and the legal, professional, statutory and commercial frameworks that enable or hinder this role (GC11.1).

Students should draw heavily on their experience in practice or in the field, citing relevant case-studies and precedents, in order to display a nuanced understanding of the strategies and means of communication necessary to procure their proposal. While at this stage, the project is still in development, consideration of contract forms, the phasing of construction and access to materials is a critical component of this exercise (GC11.2).
This essay is an essential building block for the direction of the main Design Thesis as it grounds the theoretical and technical aspects of the thesis work within a defined context, and reinforces the relationship between design development and pure research.
Examination Procedure (10%): Double marked by internal departmental examiners.

75 + Distinction
High level of argumentation and methodological rigour in the pursuit of a developed project implementation plan. Very clearly argued and communicated strategy with an exemplary use of original, primary source material; excellent grasp of, and close engagement with, issues of cultural context; thorough documentation of the social, economic and political factors influencing the implementation strategy; bold, inventive, evidence-based proposals, beautifully described in writing and supported by a well-coordinated, appropriately scaled set of diagrams, images, and primary source material, thorough and convincing integration of technical issues at both the strategic and detailed levels.
68 – 74% Good Pass
Methodologically convincing in its argumentation. Good overall grasp of principles and range of factors impacting the realisation of the outline thesis project. Clearly argued and communicated strategy with a good use of original, primary source material; clear engagement with issues of cultural context; relevant documentation of the social, economic and political factors influencing the implementation strategy; thoughtful, evidence-based proposals, clearly described in writing and supported by a coordinated, appropriately scaled set of diagrams, images, primary source material, convincing integration of technical issues at both the strategic and detailed levels. N.B. Any candidate hoping to continue to doctoral study must obtain an overall average of at least 70%.
60 – 67% Pass
Satisfactory in its argumentation and associated methodology. Relatively clear demonstration of the range of factors impacting the realisation of the outline thesis project; relatively prosaic but meaningful strategy for the implementation of an outline design with credible responses to issues of cultural context; relevant documentation of the social, economic and political factors influencing the implementation strategy; relatively well-resolved, evidence-based proposals, adequately described in writing and supported by a reasonably full and sensible set of diagrams, images, primary source material, competent integration of technical issues.